The Lo-Tech Navigator

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Sheridan House #ad - The lo-tech navigator is an entertaining and practical book for those who wish to be less dependent on GPS and electronics. Through a variety of illustrated projects, you can learn to make traditional navigation instruments and explore some unusual and long forgotten techniques. Tony crowley explains how to: detect sea currents using a kettle; find latitude and longitude by the Pole Star; take sun sights with a cassette holder, make a compass from a tin lid, navigate with the aid of poetry, self-steer with a tiller sail, find your position through origami, search for buried and discover the magic of 6.

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Secrets of the Viking Navigators: How the Vikings Used their Amazing Sunstones and other Techniques to Cross the Open Ocean

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One Earth Press #ad - Used book in Good Condition. How the vikings used their amazing sunstones and other techniques to cross the open ocean.

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Latitude Hooks and Azimuth Rings: How to Build and Use 18 Traditional Navigational Tools

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International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press #ad - The cross-staff falls somewhere in between, equally at home in the den or the ditch kit. On the other hand, the sounding line is an important and practical tool for small-craft navigation, particularly in the absence of an electronic sounder. These 18 projects fall roughly into three categories: decorative, useful, and somewhere in between.

Dennis fisher has designed these projects with an emphasis on simplicity and reasonable cost. Used book in Good Condition. Each of the devices discussed here--with simple, proven building instructions complemented by clear illustrations--has at one time or another been used for the practical business of navigation, historic value, and each is worth reviving for its beauty, or sheer usefulness.

Latitude Hooks and Azimuth Rings: How to Build and Use 18 Traditional Navigational Tools #ad - Latitude hooks and azimuth Rings is for people who like to work with their hands and who appreciate traditional nautical craftsmanship. Some, such as the astrolabe, are mainly for display. You don't have to be the master of any craft to undertake any of these projects--from a simple kamal or latitude hook to the more complex pelorus or octant--just a careful and enthusiastic worker.

Everything can be scratch-built using easily obtainable materials and tools, and each is true to the spirit and function of the original instrument.

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Emergency Navigation: Improvised and No-Instrument Methods for the Prudent Mariner, 2nd Edition

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International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press #ad - . Whether you’re safe on your boat or drifting in a life raft, let David Burch show you how to find your way no matter what navigational equipment you have. Thorough and authoritative. Sea kayaker “a definitive work of instant appeal to seamen of all levels of experience. The navigation Foundation Every sailor knows that instruments can fail.

Often relying on common materials like a small stick, burch explains how to make use of all available means--from the ancient skills of Polynesian navigators to the contrails of airliners overhead--to calculate speed, a plastic bottle, direction, latitude, even a pair of sunglasses, and longitude and to perform all aspects of piloting and dead reckoning.

Emergency Navigation: Improvised and No-Instrument Methods for the Prudent Mariner, 2nd Edition #ad - Learn how to steer by sun, stars, wind, and swells estimate current and leeway Improvise your own knotmeter or plumb-bob sextant Find the sun in a fogbank Estimate latitude with a plate and a knotted string And more vital information Used book in Good Condition. Provides the clearest understanding of general navigation principles we've seen yet.

BoatU. S. Find your way at sea, no matter What “Inherently interesting and fun to read. Things get wet, break, fall overboard.

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